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Scottsdale Wage And Hour Disputes Lawyer

At the law firm of The Zoldan Law Group, we understand how frustrating it can be for individuals to bring on a wage and hour dispute. Our firm will work quickly to evaluate and resolve your wage and hour case. We will work to resolve problems in ways that benefits both parties involved. Doing so will lessen negative financial ramifications for both employer and employee, often times allowing for a faster resolution.

Arizona Lawyers Helping Workers Get the Wages They Have Earned

The Zoldan Law Group has extensive experience handling wage and hour disputes involving the following:

Contact an Experienced Wage and Hour Attorney

If you feel that your employer owes you for unpaid wages, call The Zoldan Law Group today to set up a consultation. We can answer your questions and help address your concerns. Let our experience work for you.

What is Wage and Hour Law?

Wage and hour laws are a group of laws that protect employees by governing the wage rates an employer can pay as well as the hours an employee must be compensated. These laws also cover issues such as overtime, mandatory meal and rest breaks, minimum wage, tips, vacation and sick leave, severance, and more. Most states have their own wage and hour laws, in addition to the federal law called the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

How Long Does an Employer Have to Pay You in Arizona?

As long as you are actively employed, your employer must pay you at least twice a month with no longer than 16 days in between, under Arizona’s wage and hour laws. Employees who are terminated must receive their final paycheck within seven working days or by the next scheduled payday, whichever is sooner. If an employee quits, Arizona employers are permitted to issue a final paycheck on the next scheduled payday.

If your employer fails to issue your last paycheck within the allotted time or withholds wages you are owed when you are terminated, you then have the right to either file a civil lawsuit or a wage complaint with the Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA). Consult with a wage and hour disputes lawyer to discuss the best course of action for your claim.

What is Wage and Hour Law?

Wage and hour laws are a group of laws that protect employees by governing the wage rates an employer can pay as well as the hours an employee must be compensated. These laws also cover issues such as overtime, mandatory meal and rest breaks, minimum wage, tips, vacation and sick leave, severance, and more. Most states have their own wage and hour laws, in addition to the federal law called the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

How Long Does an Employer Have to Pay You in Arizona?

As long as you are actively employed, your employer must pay you at least twice a month with no longer than 16 days in between, under Arizona’s wage and hour laws. Employees who are terminated must receive their final paycheck within seven working days or by the next scheduled payday, whichever is sooner. If an employee quits, Arizona employers are permitted to issue a final paycheck on the next scheduled payday.

If your employer fails to issue your last paycheck within the allotted time or withholds wages you are owed when you are terminated, you then have the right to either file a civil lawsuit or a wage complaint with the Industrial Commission of Arizona (ICA). Consult with a wage and hour disputes lawyer to discuss the best course of action for your claim.

Types of Wage and Hour Cases in Arizona

Minimum Wage

Failing to pay minimum wage as required by federal and state law.

Meals and Rest Breaks Disputes

Unpaid break times that are 20 minutes or less, unpaid breaks in which work is still completed, or not allowing for required breaks.

Off-the-Clock Work

Failing to pay for work that is completed outside of regular work hours, or not paying for the time needed to put on or take off work-related gear or uniforms.

Vacation Pay Disputes

Not paying for vacation time that has been accrued and has not been used (if applicable).

Unpaid Overtime

Failing to pay premium overtime wages for hours that go beyond a 40-hour workweek, unless the employee is exempt. Employer wrongfully determining an employee to be an independent contractor, in order to avoid paying overtime.

Calculation Disputes

Issues with the calculation of paychecks, salary, commissions, or bonuses.

Sick Leave Disputes

Unpaid sick leave or failing to compensate employees for or carry over accrued and unused paid sick leave.

Tipped Employee Disputes

Failing to pay the difference needed for an employee to earn minimum wage, if not enough tips were made and the employee’s wages per hour are less than minimum wage. Failing to pay minimum wage for hours spent working and not earning tips, for example, completing cleaning duties after a restaurant has closed.

Unlawful Paycheck Deductions

Deductions made from an employee’s paycheck without the employee’s approval or the power to do so by state or federal law.

Withholding Wages

Failing to pay wages that an employee is owed after they have quit or have been terminated.

Can You Sue Your Employer for Unpaid Wages? Types of Damages?

Yes, under Arizona law, employees have the right to file a lawsuit against an employer for unpaid wages within two years of the violation. If the violation was willfully committed, you are allotted three years to pursue damages.

Damages can be awarded in the amount of unpaid wages, as well as treble damages that can be as high as two times what is owed. Therefore, you may recover up to three times the amount of your unpaid wages in total. In addition, $150 or more can be awarded if your employer retaliates against you for enforcing your legal rights, for each day retaliation occurs or until a verdict is reached.

If the amount of your claim is less than $5,000, you have the option to instead file a wage complaint with the Arizona Labor Department within a year of the violation.

An attorney experienced with wage and hour claims can best advise you on the best route for pursuing compensation.